What’s Hot In Blogging?

Hellifino. Already the mental pressure is building to leap the low bar of expectation for my next post, so I had a quick reconnoiter over at WP tag cloud to see. The top two lines of tags which I didn’t include in the screengrab were porn related.  I assume you’re all fully capable of finding your own porn should you be interested. Scratch that from the potentials list. How well do the tags match my interests and thus be something I know and can write intelligently about?  Lets see, “atheism” doesn’t make the list. [Sad face]

Here’s the top half of the cloud:

Selection_427

Oh look. Religion seems to be amply represented.  [Surprised face] {Sarcasm Font} Not as well as selling stuff, but still in the running. The good news is, the standards you would expect are there. Art, Music, Reading, and Movies seem solid.  So, I’ll rotate them monthly to keep things errr, “fresh”. The one new feature I think I’ll do is “Ask an Atheist”.  Once every 3 or 4 months should do I think.

Gird your loins, readers. We’re off and wobbling.

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23 Responses to What’s Hot In Blogging?

  1. carmen says:

    Yup, Je$u$ is a popular guy alright. If you’d like some ideas to chew on, you might take a look at what some of the Je$u$ freaks are on about –
    https://recoveringknowitall.wordpress.com/2016/08/28/the-easily-offended-god-of-the-bible/.
    Real charmers, they are. 🙂 (You’ll see that mrsmcmum has ‘liked’ Ufuomaee’s comment – she’s a fan! Surprise, surprise!)

    Like

    • persedeplume says:

      Thanks for the link.
      Ugh. One of *the most obnoxious* things about some christians is that they think their faith gives them license to say things on the internet they might not risk in a face to face encounter. Their arguments are edicts rather than persuasion, and they exhibit none of the compassion and empathy you’d expect if you read the gospels. I’ve yet to “meet” Ufuomaee, she seems pretty self righteous in her writing. That’s a pretty busy thread. 🙂

      Like

      • carmen says:

        Yes, well, some of the Christians one ‘meets’ online are quite different than Christians in my real life. In fact, all of the Christians I know would be embarrassed by the zealots one encounters online. (I live in Canada and I think the word used to describe religion here is ‘discrete’ – that is, you won’t find many fundamentalists, although they certainly are around. However, they save their passion for church on Sunday; they don’t push it on others) I am genuinely amazed at some of the stories people tell who live in the Bible Belt – Christian music being played in public places?? Sheesh!

        Like

        • persedeplume says:

          You guys in Canada have it made. I’m gonna sneak in if Trump gets elected.
          There is no seeming limit to the lengths some go to proselytize. I don’t live in the “bible belt” and yet the other day I was approached in a diner while I was eating with the “have you accepted jeebus” schtick. I’m afraid I embarrassed them quite publicly for their efforts. It’s literally inescapable.

          Like

          • carmen says:

            I have been telling all my American on-line friends, “Please come! – we’d love to have you”
            I don’t know if you’ve seen this or not –
            http://cbiftrumpwins.com/#intro
            You might get a kick out of it! 🙂
            I won’t say it’s never happened in Canada, but I’m 58 and I’ve never had an encounter like you had at the diner. . I would be quite shocked if it did happen!

            Like

            • persedeplume says:

              I’ve visited Canada many times, but never made it to Cape Breton. It’s quite lovely I see.
              I’ve amused myself at length with
              http://trumpdonald.org/
              Mouse and left click liberally. [pun intended]
              I’ve had them knock at home too. I never get a second visit.

              Like

            • carmen says:

              We only get JW’s coming around in these parts. Needless to say, I don’t think they’ll ever come back here, either! 😉 I was cordial with them for years, but a few years ago a little girl showed up on my doorstep (I say little girl, because I had her in school) who is my son’s age. I just couldn’t stand the thought of that innocent, lovely young woman belonging to a cult, so I told her so. The older woman who accompanied her took offence to my suggestions (I can’t imagine why?) and hastened her out of here. Since then, I haven’t been ‘blessed’ by their presence.

              Liked by 1 person

            • persedeplume says:

              JW’s are the easiest to get rid of. Tell them you’ve been disfellowshipped and they’ll spread the word to all in your area.

              Liked by 1 person

  2. carmen says:

    Oh, I’m sure they spread the word about me alright. 🙂

    Like

  3. KIA says:

    Thx for the follow. And the like. I’m following back

    Like

  4. persedeplume says:

    Yes, I am. I left seminary after graduation and refused ordination rather than live what I considered to be a lie. I was more fortunate than some who invest many years in the ministry and have to try and cope with the ramifications of that drastic a change. Got 40+ years of experience as an apostate.

    Like

    • carmen says:

      I have a FB friend who is still in the ministry and does not believe. He’s been trying to get out for five years, but a 55-yr-old man’s job opportunities are limited; he feels that he can’t do anything else. (he has a family and children in college) As you might suspect, the toll on his health has been terrible. It’s heartbreaking to hear of his troubles. 😦
      Smart and brave guy, to get out before ordination!

      Like

      • persedeplume says:

        He has my sympathy. It’s not an easy thing. I’ve had some tell me it was like dying. Coming out often means losing friends and family, all your social support systems. If your FB friend isn’t aware of “The Clergy Project” here’s a link. They may or may not be helpful financially, but they’re an excellent emotional support and an opportunity for networking with others. http://clergyproject.org/
        For what it’s worth, I didn’t feel all that smart at the time.

        Like

        • carmen says:

          Yes, he’s involved with The Clergy Project. Things just aren’t happening that fast. I have heard some heartbreaking stories, persedeplume, in the last few years. There are people who’ve been completely shut off from their families for becoming apostates. A man who comments says that he’s never seen his grandchildren, simply because he does not believe in the holy spook. Such absolute nonsense because of something that is in someone’s head/imagination. Very distressing that sensible people would think such foolishness.
          However, I was part of that scene for many years. I was a social christian (I say that because I readily admit to succumbing to the social advantages of belonging to a church) until 2014. I cannot say that I honestly believed sincerely but I definitely went through the motions. It’s a long story but until my eldest said to me, ” Mum, you really don’t believe all that, do you?” I hadn’t questioned anything. Once one opens the door of doubt, there’s no closing it. I readily admit to being a complete hypocrite for many years. 😦

          Liked by 1 person

          • persedeplume says:

            “Once one opens the door of doubt, there’s no closing it”
            I think that’s true in many cases. I really wanted to believe. In the end I just couldn’t. It was a completely frustrating and empty experience. I felt betrayed and angry for having wasted so much of my life.

            Like

  5. migarium says:

    It’s good to see you again, my Earthling friend.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. judyt54 says:

    And here in Yankee land we too are most circumspect about religion, only the Jehovah’s and occasionally the Mormons push. I found that the JWs were annoyingly persistent, until I suggested something suggestive (at least by their lights) and they never came back. aha, she said. I found the key.
    But around here it’s considered gauche to ask, and rude to talk about religion, yours or anyone else’s, unless you all belong to the same church. No one ever EVER asks what you believe, and no one ever volunteers the information. It’s quite restful.

    We do have a new crop of churches in the area, Grace Churches, which are somewhere between a military installation (Im not joking) and a very controlling version of a cult that goes by the name of a church, i.e., Grace Baptist, Grace Methodist…and if you do not subscribe to their beliefs, but your family does, they are instructed to shun you. Peace on earth, brothers.

    Like

    • persedeplume says:

      The Grace church bunch you refer to sound a lot like the Living Water Revival movement of the 70’s. Except for the shunning. That crowd would descend on an area like locusts and pursue us heathens down to the last person.
      Hereabouts there’s more churches than there are convenience stores. It’s all a different flavor. 1st church of the 2nd coming, Catholics, LDS, PDQ, Pentecost, Pentecost light, Pentecost RIGHT NOW, Southern Bapt. Methodist, Lutheran, 2nd Church of the Leaky Roof, Unwed Moms, the list is endless.

      Like

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